Sarah E. Domoff, PhD

Clinical Child Psychologist, Expert on Children's Media use and Problematic Media Use in Adolescents. Director of the Family Health Lab, Central Michigan University

Tag: publication

Eating when bored: A revision of the emotional eating scale with a focus on boredom.

Eating when bored: A revision of the emotional eating scale with a focus on boredom.

Koball, A. M., Meers, M. R., Storfer-Isser, A., Domoff, S. E., & Musher-Eizenman, D. R. (2012). Eating when bored: A revision of the emotional eating scale with a focus on boredom. Health Psychology, 31, 521-524. DOI: 10.1037/a0025893

Abstract: The current study explored whether eating when bored is a distinct construct from other negative emotions by revising the Emotional Eating Scale (EES) to include a separate boredom factor. Additionally, the relative endorsement of eating when bored compared to eating in response to other negative emotions was examined. Method: A convenience sample of 139 undergraduates completed open-ended questions regarding their behaviors when experiencing different levels of emotions. Participants were then given the 25-item EES with 6 additional items designed to measure boredom. Results: On the open-ended items, participants more often reported eating in response to boredom than the other emotions. Exploratory factor analysis showed that boredom is a separate construct from other negative emotions. Additionally, the most frequently endorsed item on the EES was “eating when bored.” Conclusions: These results suggest that boredom is an important construct, and that it should be considered a separate dimension of emotional eating.

Prediction of restraints among youth in a psychiatric hospital: Application of translational action research.

Prediction of restraints among youth in a psychiatric hospital: Application of translational action research.

Tompsett, C. J., Domoff, S., and Boxer, P. (2011). Prediction of restraints among youth in a psychiatric hospital: Application of translational action research. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67, 368–382. DOI: 10.1002/jclp.20772

Abstract: This study extends a translational action research program by applying a theoretically based measure of risk in predicting incidents of restraint among children and adolescents in a secure psychiatric hospital. Youth inpatients (N = 149, aged 5–17 years) were assessed at intake for the presence of selected individual and contextual risk factors, and their involvement in critical incidents was tracked (i.e., number of episodes in which restraint was applied) for the remainder of their hospitalization. Models including history of aggression or history of previous placements as well as combined models including several individual and contextual factors significantly predicted the likelihood of a youth becoming involved in at least one restraint. Unique predictors of restraint involvement included history of aggression against adults and history of previous psychiatric hospitalizations. None of the variables assessed predicted the extent of a youth’s restraint involvement. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to future research and empirically informed practice with high-risk youth.

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