Sarah E. Domoff, PhD

Clinical Child Psychologist, Expert on Children's Media Use and Problematic Media Use in Adolescents. Director of the Family Health Lab, Central Michigan University

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Child Trends Spotlight on Dr. Domoff’s Research

Link to the full article: http://www.academicpedsjnl.net/article/S1876-2859(16)30533-2/abstract

The Family Health Lab Receives Grant Approval

Congrats to Dr. Domoff! The Family Health Lab has been approved for a grant from CMU’s Faculty Research and Creative Endeavors Committee (FRCE). This will help us conduct our research about adolescents and their mobile device use.

Development and Validation of the Problematic Media Use Measure: A Parent Report Measure of Screen Media “Addiction” in Children.

Development and Validation of the Problematic Media Use Measure: A Parent Report Measure of Screen Media “Addiction” in Children.

Domoff, S.E., Harrison, K., Gearhardt, A.N., Gentile, D.A., Lumeng, J.C., & Miller, A.L. Development and Validation of the Problematic Media Use Measure: A Parent Report Measure of Screen Media “Addiction” in Children. Psychology of Popular Media Culture.

Abstract: Although problematic media use among adolescents is of wide interest, less is known regarding problematic media use among younger children. The current study reports on the development and validation of a parent-report measure of one potential aspect of children’s problematic use—screen media addiction—via the Problematic Media Use Measure (PMUM). Items were based on the 9 criteria for Internet gaming disorder in the DSM–5. The first study describes the development and preliminary validation of the PMUM in a sample of 291 mothers. Mothers (80.8% identified as White) of children aged four through 11 years of age completed the PMUM, and measures of child screen time and child psychosocial functioning. Exploratory factor analyses indicated a unidimensional construct of screen media addiction. The final versions of the PMUM (27 items) and PMUM Short Form (PMUM-SF; 9 items) evidenced high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .97 and α = .93, respectively). Regression analyses were conducted to examine the convergent validity of the PMUM with indicators of child psychosocial functioning. Convergent validity was supported, and the PMUM scales also independently predicted children’s total difficulties in functioning, over and above hours of screen time, indicating incremental validity. The second study sought to confirm the factor structure of the PMUM-SF and test for measurement invariance across gender. In a sample of 632 parents, we confirmed the factor structure of the PMUM-SF and found measurement invariance for boys and girls. These studies support the use of the PMUM-SF as a measure of screen media addiction in children aged 4 through 11 years old.

Pictures from the 2017 Honors Exhibition

Senior Katelin Crane presented “Developing an Intervention to Promote Healthy Social Media Use in an Adolescent Inpatient Population” and junior Rachel Gerrie presented “Intervention for At-Risk Adolescents: Developing and Adhering to Healthy Social Media Practices” at the 2017 Honors Exhibition. They helped get the word out about our lab and were busy talking to interested students!

Multiple News Sources Feature Dr. Domoff’s “Problematic Media Use Measure”

Dr. Domoff’s “Problematic Media Use Measure” is featured in multiple news sources!

2017 Honors Exhibition

Senior Katelin Crane and junior Rachel Gerrie will be presenting their honors capstone projects at the Honors Exhibition on December 4th. The event will be from 7-9pm in the Bovee University Center’s Rotunda. This is a great chance to learn more about our research and support our amazing research assistants!

Congratulations Amy and Katie!

Senior Katelin Crane has been interviewing at multiple nurse practitioner graduate programs. We’re sad to think about her leaving, but excited about what she’ll accomplish as an NP! Way to go Katie!

Junior Amy Nichols has been accepted as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar! This is a fantastic opportunity that will allow her to become even more involved in our research. Great job Amy!

Dr. Domoff’s “Problematic Media Use Measure” Featured in Psychology Today Article Online

We’re excited to announce that Psychology Today published an article online about Dr. Domoff’s Problematic Media Use Measure (PMUM)!

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/media-spotlight/201711/does-your-child-have-digital-addiction

The recent publication: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2017-51599-001?doi=1

Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States.

Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States.

Domoff, S.E., Miller, A. L., Khalatbari, N., Pesch, M., Harrison, K., Rosenblum, K., & Lumeng, J .C. (2017). Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States. Journal of Children and Media.

Abstract: Low-income children are at greater risk for excess screen time and negative correlates associated with screen media use. The goal of this study is to increase our understanding of low-income mothers’ beliefs and practices around their children’s television (TV) use (parental mediation). We administered semi-structured interviews to 296 low-income mothers of children ages four–eight years old in the United States. Five themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: (1) mothers are confident in restriction of TV content; (2) time limits are not as important as TV content and are only necessary in extreme situations; (3) mothers make meaning of child learning from TV content; (4) mothers identified individual differences in child TV overuse; and (5) mothers’ policy on TV during mealtime depends on how they believe TV to affect child mealtime behaviors and mothers’ mealtime goals. We discuss the implications of these themes for promoting parental mediation in low-income families.

Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families.

Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families.

Domoff, S. E., Lumeng, J. C., Kaciroti, N., & Miller, A. L. (2016). Early Childhood Risk Factors for Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families. Academic Pediatrics.  doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2016.12.003

Abstract:
Objective: To identify whether child and mother characteristics in early childhood predict TV exposure and engagement during mealtime in middle childhood.

Methods: A total of 220 low-income mother-child dyads participated. Children were 4.26 years old (SD = 0.51) at baseline and 5.94 years (SD = 0.68) at 2-year follow-up. Mothers completed baseline measures of child negative emotionality and parenting practices. Family mealtimes were video recorded and coded for background TV exposure and child TV engagement. Multinomial logistic regression tested whether child emotionality and parenting practices during early childhood predicted risk of child TV exposure or engagement during mealtime, relative to no TV use, 2 years later.

Results: Children with greater negative emotionality in early childhood were more likely to engage with TV during mealtime than to have no TV. Similarly, early parenting disciplinary practices characterized by over-reactivity and laxness increased the risk for child TV engagement versus no TV during mealtime approximately 2 years later.

Conclusions: We identified 2 factors that associated with an increased risk for TV viewing during meals. Helping parents manage child negative emotionality using positive parenting strategies might reduce later child TV engagement and improve the quality of family mealtimes.

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