Sarah E. Domoff, PhD

Clinical Child Psychologist, Expert on Children's Media Use and Problematic Media Use in Adolescents. Director of the Family Health Lab, Central Michigan University

Category: Uncategorized (Page 4 of 4)

Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis.

Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis.

Koball, A.K., Jester, D.J., Domoff, S.E., Kallies, K.J., Grothe, K.B., & Kothari, S.N. (2017). Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Abstract:
Background: Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups.

Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook.
Setting: Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States.

Methods: Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70).

Results: More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently.

Conclusions: Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the “bariatric lifestyle” for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients.

Dr. Domoff to Present at the University of Michigan-Flint

Dr. Domoff will present, “Growing up in the Digital Age: Mobile Media Use and Child Development” to the University of Michigan-Flint on March 17, 2017.

Dr. Domoff Presented to the Department of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University

Dr. Domoff presented, “Parenting in the Digital Age: Implications for Child Health and Development” to the Department of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University on December 9, 2016.  

Changing maternal perceptions of healthy feeding: A novel intervention.

Changing maternal perceptions of healthy feeding: A novel intervention.

Meers, M. R., Domoff, S. E., Leroy, M., Zbur, S., & Musher-Eizenman, D. R. (2015). Changing maternal perceptions of healthy feeding: A novel intervention. Pediatric Obesity. 11 (4), 258-263 doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12054

Objective: This study sought to better understand factors influencing mothers’ perceptions about healthy feeding. Additionally, a social consensus intervention was used to try to change mothers’ likelihood to serve healthy foods.

College students’ perceptions of collective efficacy: Results from a non-urban sample.

College students’ perceptions of collective efficacy: Results from a non-urban sample.

Domoff, S. E., Hayman, J., & Tompsett, C. J. (2012). College students’ perceptions of collective efficacy: Results from a non-urban sample. Journal of Community Psychology, 40 762-768. DOI: 10.1002/jcop.21498

Abstract: Although the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and collective efficacy is well established in urban populations with community samples, it is unclear if this relationship holds in rural areas. The current study fills this gap by assessing the perceptions of adolescents from nonurban areas to examine the relationships between neighborhood characteristics and collective efficacy in areas with lower population density. Our sample comprised 402 late adolescents attending a Midwestern university (average age 19.1 years). Consistent with previous studies using urban neighborhoods, we found that higher concentrated disadvantage was related to lower levels of social cohesion, regardless of population density. However, neither residential stability nor concentrated immigration was predictive of social cohesion. None of the neighborhood characteristics significantly predicted social control, after controlling for population density.

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