Sarah E. Domoff, PhD

Clinical Child Psychologist, Expert on Children's Media Use and Problematic Media Use in Adolescents. Director of the Family Health Lab, Central Michigan University

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Dr. Domoff Led “Media Use and Adolescent Mental Health” Workshop

Dr. Sarah Domoff led a workshop on “Media Use and Adolescent Mental Health” for social workers in Grand Rapids, Michigan on January 10, 2018 for Forest View Hospital’s Breakfast and Learn Series.

Welcome Katie!

We are very excited to welcome Katie as the newest research assistant in the Family Health Lab! Katie is a freshman at CMU majoring in psychology and minoring in nutrition. She is interested in learning more about eating disorders and will be primarily helping with our research about teenagers and their mobile device use. Welcome Katie!

The Family Health Lab Receives Grant Approval

Congrats to Dr. Domoff! The Family Health Lab has been approved for a grant from CMU’s Faculty Research and Creative Endeavors Committee (FRCE). This will help us conduct our research about adolescents and their mobile device use.

Pictures from the 2017 Honors Exhibition

Senior Katelin Crane presented “Developing an Intervention to Promote Healthy Social Media Use in an Adolescent Inpatient Population” and junior Rachel Gerrie presented “Intervention for At-Risk Adolescents: Developing and Adhering to Healthy Social Media Practices” at the 2017 Honors Exhibition. They helped get the word out about our lab and were busy talking to interested students!

Dr. Domoff to present at Grand Rapids Community College

Dr. Domoff will present, “Child Development in the Digital Age: How, and for Whom, Does Mobile Media Use Become Problematic?” in a guest lecture at Grand Rapids Community College for their 2017-2018 Psychology Speaker Series on November 30, 2017.

Dr. Domoff to Lead “Understanding Media and Mobile Device Use and the Impact on the Social-Emotional Development and Academic Achievement of Students” Workshop

Dr. Sarah Domoff will lead a workshop on “Understanding Media and Mobile Device Use and the Impact on the Social-Emotional Development and Academic Achievement of Students” for high school teachers and counselors in school districts in Northwestern Ohio on November 17, 2017. This opportunity was organized by the Ridge Project and Project Respect.           

Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States.

Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States.

Domoff, S.E., Miller, A. L., Khalatbari, N., Pesch, M., Harrison, K., Rosenblum, K., & Lumeng, J .C. (2017). Maternal Beliefs about Children’s Television and Parental Mediation in a Low-Income Sample in the United States. Journal of Children and Media.

Abstract: Low-income children are at greater risk for excess screen time and negative correlates associated with screen media use. The goal of this study is to increase our understanding of low-income mothers’ beliefs and practices around their children’s television (TV) use (parental mediation). We administered semi-structured interviews to 296 low-income mothers of children ages four–eight years old in the United States. Five themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: (1) mothers are confident in restriction of TV content; (2) time limits are not as important as TV content and are only necessary in extreme situations; (3) mothers make meaning of child learning from TV content; (4) mothers identified individual differences in child TV overuse; and (5) mothers’ policy on TV during mealtime depends on how they believe TV to affect child mealtime behaviors and mothers’ mealtime goals. We discuss the implications of these themes for promoting parental mediation in low-income families.

Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families.

Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families.

Domoff, S. E., Lumeng, J. C., Kaciroti, N., & Miller, A. L. (2016). Early Childhood Risk Factors for Mealtime TV Exposure and Engagement in Low-Income Families. Academic Pediatrics.  doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2016.12.003

Abstract:
Objective: To identify whether child and mother characteristics in early childhood predict TV exposure and engagement during mealtime in middle childhood.

Methods: A total of 220 low-income mother-child dyads participated. Children were 4.26 years old (SD = 0.51) at baseline and 5.94 years (SD = 0.68) at 2-year follow-up. Mothers completed baseline measures of child negative emotionality and parenting practices. Family mealtimes were video recorded and coded for background TV exposure and child TV engagement. Multinomial logistic regression tested whether child emotionality and parenting practices during early childhood predicted risk of child TV exposure or engagement during mealtime, relative to no TV use, 2 years later.

Results: Children with greater negative emotionality in early childhood were more likely to engage with TV during mealtime than to have no TV. Similarly, early parenting disciplinary practices characterized by over-reactivity and laxness increased the risk for child TV engagement versus no TV during mealtime approximately 2 years later.

Conclusions: We identified 2 factors that associated with an increased risk for TV viewing during meals. Helping parents manage child negative emotionality using positive parenting strategies might reduce later child TV engagement and improve the quality of family mealtimes.

Dr. Domoff Delivered a Speech at the Annual Research Symposium at the University of Toledo Medical Center

Dr. Domoff delivered, “Addressing Problematic Media Use in Children: Best Practices for Clinicians in the Digital Age” as the keynote speaker for the Annual Research Symposium at the University of Toledo Medical Center on April 27, 2017.

Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis.

Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis.

Koball, A.K., Jester, D.J., Domoff, S.E., Kallies, K.J., Grothe, K.B., & Kothari, S.N. (2017). Examination of Bariatric Surgery Facebook Support Groups: A Content Analysis. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Abstract:
Background: Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups.

Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook.
Setting: Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States.

Methods: Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70).

Results: More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently.

Conclusions: Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the “bariatric lifestyle” for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients.

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